Thursday, March 15, 2012

Skillet Chocolate Chip Cookie

Skillet Chocolate Chip Cookie


"Oooh, big cookie," Joe said as he walked past the cooling skillet.  This just looks like a fun recipe.  It's also easy to throw together, and you save a little time from the usual scooping of smaller cookies onto a baking sheet.

The drawback?  It's a bit dry.  The original recipe didn't have any such complaint in its reviews, so I hope it wasn't because I replaced a quarter of the flour with white whole wheat flour.  Or maybe other people used skillets that weren't cast iron -- which conducts more heat -- like I did?  Some people even commented that they used pie pans.  Maybe because I decided to forgo the ice cream and caramel sauce.  If you have a skillet variation you recommend, leave me a comment.  I'd like to give this another go!

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Skillet Chocolate Chip Cookie
From Martha Stewart

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
¾ cup unsalted butter, softened
½ cup sugar
¾ cup packed light-brown sugar
1 large egg
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1½ (about 9 ounces) mixed milk- and semisweet-chocolate chips
2 pints vanilla ice cream
Caramel Sauce

Preheat oven to 350°. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt; set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream butter and sugars until mixture is light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add egg and vanilla; mix until they are fully incorporated. Add flour mixture, and beat until just combined. Stir in chocolate chips.

Transfer dough to a 10-inch ovenproof skillet, and press to flatten, covering bottom of pan. Bake until edges are brown and top is golden, 40 to 45 minutes. Don't overbake; it will continue to cook a few minutes out of the oven. Transfer to a wire rack to cool, 15 to 20 minutes. Cut into 8 wedges. Serve warm; top each wedge with a scoop of ice cream and some caramel sauce.

17 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness! I've had this at a local restaurant before but have never contemplated making it at home. Guess what I'll be doing this weekend?! :)

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  2. Big cookie indeed! I think, just to make sure it's a little more soft, a pie pan might work the best. A cast iron would draw out more heat and for sure make your a little more crisp or dry. You could try to under cook it a bit as well - god knows I love a lovely moist and chewy cookie! Especially if it's giant!

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    1. The funny thing is, the photo in the original recipe was a cast iron pan. So I thought it would be fine, plus I think cast iron pans are so beautiful and have some kind of folksy charm. :) Undercooking is a good idea!

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  3. I want these giant cookies mommy! I can hear my daughter begging another serving. Yum!

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    1. You'll have to make them for her! :)

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  4. It sure looks amazing! Perhaps just cut down on the baking time with the cast iron.

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  5. Maybe cast iron pan didn't work, but the picture looks gorgeous! I think making this is VERY dangerous for me... =)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Nami! It's super simple too.

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  6. I've been wanting to try this recipe for a long time, and hopefully I'll make it soon. I'm sure my other-half will just love it

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  7. You know, I've found that sometimes when I use whole wheat flour, things end up a little bit dry too. But sometimes they don't--there doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason to it.

    But anyway, you had me at giant cookie. :) This is such a fun idea!

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    1. This may call for a redo. That'll teach me to eat healthier! ;)

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  8. I found you through the martha stewart site. If you don't mind my advice, I think the difference between your pan and the one pictured is that yours is dark and theirs was enamelled. Apparently this makes a difference in cook time, since dark pans absorb more heat. A lot like wearing white instead of black to stay cool on a hot day. :D Hope that helps! I'm going to try this recipe soon!

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  9. If you don't mind my advice, I think the reason your cookie turned out too dry may be because, although cast iron like the skillet pictured on MS (I found you through your comment there), yours is dark and theirs is light. Dark pans absorb and distribute more heat, so they usually require a shorter cook time. A lot like wearing black on a hot day is supposed to draw heat from the sun. :D I hope that helps! I'll be trying this recipe soon.

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    1. I don't mind it at all. And your comment reminds me that I should give this another go. Thanks!

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  10. I make this cookie often using the exact directions, and cooking in a dark cast iron skillet, and it turns out fine!

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    1. Thanks for sharing. That's really interesting -- I'm going to chalk it up to my use of whole wheat flour, which I know can dry some baked goods out. Or maybe I measured wrong when I made this? That's why I wish more recipes would be written by weight instead of volume. I might give it another try this week.

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